Last edited by Kajit
Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

5 edition of Dickens and the grotesque found in the catalog.

Dickens and the grotesque

by Michael Hollington

  • 284 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Croom Helm, Barnes & Noble in London, Totowa, N.J .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870 -- Criticism and interpretation.,
  • Grotesque in literature.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementMichael Hollington.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPR4592.G7 H6 1984
    The Physical Object
    Pagination261 p. ;
    Number of Pages261
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3184503M
    ISBN 100389204579
    LC Control Number83027302

    Oliver Twist book. Read 7, reviews from the world's largest community for readers. This darkest and most colorfully grotesque of Charles Dickens’s nov /5(K). Unique to this book, unlike Dickens other works, is a fairy tale quality to the story. It is certainly a book of contrasts: the purity of Nell compared to the sadistic depravity of Quilp, fresh air and scenic villages to the polluted, stone covered city, etc. Even people’s reactions to the book revealed a stark contrast.

    Great Expectations is the thirteenth novel by Charles Dickens and his penultimate completed novel, which depicts the education of an orphan nicknamed Pip (the book is a bildungsroman, a coming-of-age story).It is Dickens's second novel, after David Copperfield, to be fully narrated in the first person. The novel was first published as a serial in Dickens's weekly periodical All the Year Round. Charles Dickens's Great Expectations () is essentially a realist novel which incorporates numerous other genres into its narrative framework. One of the literary modes Dickens employs is the grotesque. Many scenes throughout the story utilize the grotesque although it is particularly apparent in the opening chapters, where the protagonist Pip encounters the escaped convict Abel Magwitch.

    Yet he has also received criticism from writers such as George Henry Lewes, Henry James, and Virginia Woolf, who list sentimentality, implausible occurrence and grotesque characters as faults in his oeuvre. The popularity of Dickens' novels and short stories has meant that none have ever gone out of print. Exploring the political, psychological and creative functions of the grotesque in writings by Tobias Smollett, Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, Djuna Barnes and Roald Dahl - as well as in cartoons by William Hogarth, in art and architecture, and in Victorian scientific culture, students will also have the opportunity to visit several archives.


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Dickens and the grotesque by Michael Hollington Download PDF EPUB FB2

The study begins by exploring definitions of the grotesque and moves on to look at three key aspects that particularly impacted on Dickens’ imagination: popular theatre (especially pantomime), caricature, and the tradition of the Gothic : Michael Hollington.

Book Description. First published inthis title examines the development of a special rhetoric in Dickens’ work, which, by using grotesque effects, challenged the complacency of his middle-class Victorian readers. The study begins by exploring definitions of the grotesque and moves on to look at three key aspects that particularly.

Get this from a library. Dickens and the grotesque. [Michael Hollington] -- First published inthis title examines the development of a special rhetoric in Dickens' work, which, by using grotesque effects, challenged the complacency of his middle-class Victorian.

Books Online Dickens and the Grotesque (Routledge Revivals) - First published inthis title examines the development of a special rhetoric in Dickens' work, which, by using grotesque effects, challenged the complacency of his middle-class Victorian readers.

The study begins by exploring definitions of the grotesque and moves on to look at. Read "Dickens and the Grotesque (Routledge Revivals)" by Michael Hollington available from Rakuten Kobo.

First published in Dickens and the grotesque book, this title examines the development of a special rhetoric in Dickens’ work, which, by using gro Brand: Taylor And Francis.

Dickens and the Grotesque by Michael Hollington,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. 6 See Michael Hollington’s article on the “grotesque”, in the Oxford Reader’s Companion to Dickens 7 Analysed by Garrett Stewart in Dickens and the Trials of the Imagination Stewart calls the new meanings which emerges from such malapropisms “ oblique rightness ” or “ creative accidents ”.

A TALE OF TWO CITIES Charles Dickens C32 NORTHANGER ABBEY and PERSUASION Jane Austen M C34 THE MOONSTONE Wilkie Collins C35 FRANKENSTEIN Mary Shelley C44 THREE MEN IN A BOAT Jerome K.

Jerome C46 TALES OF THE GROTESQUE AND ARABESQUE Edgar Allan Poe M C50 HIS MONKEY WIFE John Collier C53 LOOKING BACKWARD () Edward Bellamy C Monstrous, absurd, humorous, demotic and contradictory: the Grotesque is a protean force working across different areas of Victorian life.

This book, the first fully interdisciplinary study of the subject, examines a wide range of sources and materials in order to provide new readings of an important force that oscillates between 'style' and 'concept'. Charles Dickens Book List – The Novels, Novellas and Short Stories of Charles Dickens.

Wondering what books Dickens wrote. He was the author of 15 novels. (However, one of those is incomplete.) He also wrote short stories, essays, articles and novellas.

Note that A Christmas Carol isn’t included in the list of novels. Because of its length. You mention Great Expectations (), which is your second choice of Charles Dickens he first talks about writing this novel, he mentions “a very fine, new, and grotesque idea.” He also talks about making it funny, because the novel before that had been A Tale of Two Cities.

Forster must have said to him something along the lines of, ‘It’s absolutely wonderful of course. Since at least the 18th century Italy (in French and German as well as English), grotesque has come to be used as a general adjective for the strange, mysterious, magnificent, fantastic, hideous, ugly, incongruous, unpleasant, or disgusting, and thus is often used to describe weird shapes and distorted forms such as Halloween masks.

In art, performance, and literature, however, grotesque may. The grotesque tradition, ancient and modern --The romance of real life: Sketches by Boz and Pickwick papers --'They always die when I'm at meals': Oliver Twist and Nicholas Nickleby --The old curiosity shop and the new curiosity shop --The grotesque in history: Barnaby Rudge and A tale of two cities --The grotesque in America: American notes.

grotesque. Source: Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens Author(s): Michael HollingtonMichael Hollington. Dickens's contemporaries used the term ‘grotesque’ to describe central features of his writing, and he seems to have embraced it. Try the new Google Books. Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features.

Try it now. No thanks. Try the new Google Books. View eBook. Get this book in print. ; Barnes& Dickens and the Grotesque (Routledge Revivals). First published inthis title examines the development of a special rhetoric in Dickens' work, which, by using grotesque effects, challenged the complacency of his middle-class Victorian readers.

The study begins by exploring definitions of the grotesque and moves on to look at three key aspects that particularly impacted on Dickens' imagination: popular theatre (especially pantomime. Buy Dickens and the Grotesque (Routledge Revivals) 1 by Hollington, Michael (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Michael Hollington. Michael Hollington, Dickens and the Grotesque, Taylor & Francis, Virginia E.

Swain, Grotesque Figures - Baudelaire, Rousseau, and the Aesthetics of Modernity, JHU Press, Charles Baudelaire is usually read as a paradigmatically modern poet, whose work ushered in a new era of French literature.

96 books based on votes: Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, David Copperfield by Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens, Bleak.

This book reappraises Dickens’s Memoirs of Joseph Grimaldi and his imaginative engagement with its principal protagonist. Arguing that the Memoirs should be read as integral to Dickens’s wider creative project on the theatricality of everyday existence, Jonathan Buckmaster analyses how Grimaldi’s clown stepped into many of Dickens’s novels.

Nowhere in Dickens's later novels is his attack on an uncaring society more imaginatively embodied, but nowhere either is the mixture of comedy and angry satire more deftly managed.

Charles Dickens ( - 9 June ) is arguably the greatest novelist England ever produced. Please note: This is /5(1).Description: This book provides an overview of the literary grotesque in 19th-century Europe, with special emphasis on Charles Dickens, whose use of this complex aesthetic category is thus addressed in relation with other 19th-century European writers.

The crossing of geographical boundaries allows an in-depth study of the different modes of. I picked up _Bleak House_ () after hearing several critics refer to it as Dickens’ masterpiece.

While I have not yet read _David Copperfield_ (), the author’s personal favorite among his books, and can claim only a limited knowledge of Dickens, I keep in mind G.

K. Chesterton’s assessment of the novel I consider in this review: it is his best novel, but not necessarily his best s: 1K.